AN EDUCATIVE SICILIAN PROVERB

The proverb is this:

Quannu a fortuna nun ti dici, iettiti ‘nterra e accampa fafaluci

When luck is not on your side, you had better go to the countryside and pick up snails.

Do good and bad luck exist or are they just illusions? We don’t know. However, if there is a proverb about fortune, it means that countless past generations have come into contact with both good and bad luck.

What to do in case of persistent hard luck? According to popular Sicilian wisdom, instead of fighting against hard luck, we had better give up our aims, at least temporarily. Instead, we should go to the countryside, look for snails, and collect them. In this case we would do something useful, instead of wasting energy to fight against bad luck.

Snails are a delicious food. Assuming one knows how to cook them!

Ettore Grillo, author of these books:

November 2: The Day of the Dead in Sicily (English version)

A Hidden Sicilian History (English version)

The Vibrations of Words (English version)

Travels of the Mind (English version)

– Una Storia Siciliana Nascosta (versione in lingua italiana)

– Viaggi della Mente (versione in lingua italiana)

http://www.amazon.com/author/ettoregrillo

A VERY OLD, PERHAPS OUTDATED, ITALIAN PROVERB

Chi tanti anni vol campar

Del dottor non si deve mai fidar.

He who wants to live for many years

Must never trust the doctor.

In my opinion, the best medicine is living in contact with nature, breathing pure air, jogging in the forest, or swimming in the ocean. Also, yoga and other holistic disciplines are useful in keeping the body and mind in good health.

Every time I went to my doctor’s office in Enna to ask for a medical certificate to go to the gym or to the swimming pool, I found the waiting room packed with people waiting to have prescriptions filled. If all those patients practiced a sport in the open air, the doctor’s waiting room would be less crowded and the National Health Service would save a lot of money!

Indeed, body and mind are connected. Mens sana in corpore sano (sound mind in sound body) the Romans said. I agree with this maxim and, following the aforementioned Italian proverb, I stand aloof from doctors and medicines as much as I can.

Ettore Grillo author of these books:

– November 2: The Day of the Dead in Sicily

– A Hidden Sicilian History

– The Vibrations of Words

– Travels of the Mind

http://www.amazon.com/author/ettoregrillo

THREE USEFUL SICILIAN PROVERBS

1)- Pi rumpiri c’è sempri timpu (there is always time to break up).

You do not need to rush when you want to break up a friendship or a relationship. You can wait for a while.

2)- Bon timpu e malu timpu un dura tuttu u timpu (neither bad weather nor good weather lasts forever).

The proverb is an allegory of life, which passes through sunshine and storms. Sometimes it flows smoothly and other times stormy; but it is worth living to the fullest.

3)- Duppu acchianata c’è a scinnuta (after the climb there is the descent).

It means that bad situations will turn into good opportunities. On the other hand, life is made of ups and downs. In the end, everything will be alright. You just need faith in yourself and in your good luck.

Ettore Grillo author of these books:

– November 2: The Day of the Dead in Sicily

– A Hidden Sicilian History

– The Vibrations of Words

– Travels of the Mind

http://www.amazon.com/author/ettoregrillo